Daily Report for 6/23/2022

Governor's Actions

No legislation is Signed by Governor Today

New Legislation Introduced

BillCurrent StatusSponsorSynopsisTitle
SR 31DefeatedHockerThis resolution urges the federal government to take steps to strengthen the southern border and take proactive measures to prevent drugs from entering the United States.URGING THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO TAKE STRONG, PROACTIVE MEASURES TO PREVENT DRUGS FROM ENTERING THE UNITED STATES AT THE SOUTHERN BORDER AND OTHER PORTS OF ENTRY.
SCR 107LOTBoniniThis concurrent resolution creates the School Violence Task Force to make findings and recommendations to ensure children feel safe travelling to and from school and within the school building for adequate learning to occur.CREATING THE SCHOOL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE TO MAKE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO ENSURE CHILDREN FEEL SAFE AT SCHOOL FOR ADEQUATE LEARNING TO OCCUR.
SCR 117PassedHockerThis Concurrent Resolution recognizes November 2022 as "Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month" in the State of Delaware. RECOGNIZING NOVEMBER 2022 AS "AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE AWARENESS MONTH" IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SCR 118PassedBoniniThis resolution designates October 17-23, 2022 as "Free Speech Week" in the State of DelawareDESIGNATING OCTOBER 17-23, 2022 AS "FREE SPEECH WEEK" IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SCR 122PassedBoniniThis concurrent resolution proclaims Thursday, October 6, 2022, as “National Coaches Day” in the State of Delaware.PROCLAIMING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2022, AS "NATIONAL COACHES DAY" IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SCR 121PassedBoniniThis concurrent resolution proclaims the month of October 2022 as “Depression Awareness Month” in the State of Delaware.DESIGNATING THE MONTH OF OCTOBER 2022 AS "DEPRESSION AWARENESS MONTH" IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SCR 123Passed SenateSokolaThis Act creates the Study Group to Review Compensation Payments for Certain Tax-Exempt Properties Owned by the State to evaluate § 8318 of Title 29 and make recommendations regarding the eligibility criteria for municipalities to receive compensatory payments and the formulas used to calculate the payments.ESTABLISHING A STUDY GROUP TO REVIEW COMPENSATION PAYMENTS FOR CERTAIN TAX-EXEMPT PROPERTIES OWNED BY THE STATE.
SCR 124PassedWalshThis Concurrent Resolution recognizes the month of June 2022 as Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Month.RECOGNIZING THE MONTH OF JUNE 2022 AS MYASTHENIA GRAVIS AWARENESS MONTH.
HCR 103PassedDorsey WalkerThis House Concurrent Resolution establishes a medical marijuana stakeholder group, responsible to meet at least quarterly and discuss timely and appropriate issues dealing with the Medical Marijuana Program in Delaware. DIRECTING THE OFFICE OF MEDICAL MARIJUANA TO HOLD QUARTERLY STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS.
SA 1 to HB 334PassedS. McBrideThis Amendment does all of the following: (1) Requires a health-care provider who is licensed in a state that does not have an interstate compact for the provider’s field of medicine to obtain an interstate telehealth registration in this State before practicing telehealth in this State. (2) Establishes a health-care provider’s eligibility for an interstate telehealth registration. (3) Makes clear that a health-care provider who obtains an interstate telehealth registration is subject to the laws of this State and jurisdiction of the courts and licensing boards of this State. 
SR 32StrickenBoniniThis resolution expresses concern with President Biden’s cognitive state, urges cognitive testing and publishing the results for the people in the State of Delaware.EXPRESSING CONCERN WITH PRESIDENT BIDEN’S COGNITIVE STATE, URGING COGNITIVE TESTING, AND PUBLISHING THE RESULTS FOR THE PEOPLE IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SR 33LOTBoniniThis resolution expresses concern over national inflation and federal spending negatively impacting the citizens in the State of Delaware.EXPRESSING CONCERN OVER NATIONAL INFLATION AND FEDERAL SPENDING NEGATIVELY IMPACTING CITIZENS IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
SB 337CommitteeBoniniThis Act is the first leg of a Constitutional Amendment reflecting the recommendations of the Advisory Panel to the Delaware Economic and Financial Advisory Council (DEFAC) on Potential Fiscal Controls and Budget Smoothing Mechanisms established as per House Joint Resolution 8 of the 149th General Assembly (Panel). This Act would build upon the State’s existing appropriation limit methodology by moving the Budget Reserve Account into a newly defined Budget Stabilization Fund, defining rules for deposits to and withdrawals from said Budget Stabilization Fund, and adding a check of the appropriation limit against an index comprised of relevant indicators of growth of the State’s economy. The Panel further recommended that any final adoption of the structural budget reforms included in this Act be accompanied by statutory enactment of structural reforms to the Personal Income Tax by broadening the tax base as initially recommended by the DEFAC Advisory Council of Revenues report dated May 2015 and further detailed in the Panel’s report dated June 1, 2018.AN ACT PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE VIII, § 6 OF THE DELAWARE CONSTITUTION RELATING TO LIMITATIONS ON APPROPRIATIONS.
SB 336CommitteeBoniniThis Act suspends the state taxes on motor fuel in this State for one year and sets aside a portion of the over one billion dollars in budget surplus for the current fiscal year to offset the tax holiday and ensure the stability of Delaware’s bond rating. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 30 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE MOTOR FUEL TAX AND THE CREATION OF THE MOTOR FUEL TAX HOLIDAY FUND.
SB 335CommitteeBoniniThis is the first leg of a constitutional amendment. Recent court decisions have been interpreted to require tax increases without the confirmation or consent of the General Assembly or local elected bodies. This proposed amendment makes it clear that only elected officials have the power to tax Delaware citizens. AN ACT PROPOSING THE AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE VIII OF THE DELAWARE CONSTITUTION RELATING TO REVENUE AND TAXATION.
HA 1 to SB 209PassedGriffithThis Amendment changes the effective date of this Act to six months following its enactment into law. 
HB 488CommitteeLonghurstThis Act prohibits a seller from imposing a surcharge on a cardholder who elects to use a credit card in lieu of payment by cash, check, or similar means.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 6 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO CREDIT CARD TRANSACTIONS.
HA 1 to SS 1 for SB 167PWBBaumbachThis Amendment makes the following technical corrections to Senate Substitute 1 for Senate Bill No. 167 and Senate Amendment No. 1 to Senate Substitute No. 1 for Senate Bill No. 167: 1. Replaces a word omitted from Senate Amendment No. 1 to Senate Substitute No. 1 for Senate Bill No. 167. 2. Reorganizes sentences so topics are grouped by subject. 3. Revises punctuation and hierarchy designations to conform to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual. 
SS 1 for SB 331CommitteeBoniniThis Act imposes an increased penalty for certain already illegal activity involving animal fighting by increasing the classification of felony for individuals engaging in the organization of animal fights or are directly involved in the act of carrying out or causing animal fighting by reclassifying this activity as a Class D felony. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO ANIMAL FIGHTING AND BAITING.
SA 1 to SB 326PWBWalshThis Amendment does all of the following: 1. Provides at least 3 months before this Act must be implemented. 2. Requires that the first reports required under this Act must be provided in 2023. 3. Clarifies that the Department of Justice is not required to spend more than $48,500 on translation and interpretation services in the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2023. 4. Clarifies that the reports required under §§ 10603 and 10604 of Title 29 will inform the General Assembly regarding appropriations necessary to improve program access for individuals with limited English proficiency and effective communication for individuals with disabilities. 5. Provides that § 10605 of Title 29 expires on June 30, 2023, unless extended through an appropriation or other action by the General Assembly. 
SA 2 to SB 326PWBWalshThis Amendment does all of the following: 1. Provides at least 3 months before this Act must be implemented. 2. Requires that the first reports required under this Act must be provided in 2023. 3. Clarifies that the Department of Justice is not required to spend more than $48,500 on translation and interpretation services in the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2023. 4. Clarifies that the reports required under §§ 10603 and 10604 of Title 29 will inform the General Assembly regarding appropriations necessary to improve program access for individuals with limited English proficiency and effective communication for individuals with disabilities. 5. Provides that § 10605 of Title 29 expires on June 30, 2023, unless extended through an appropriation or other action by the General Assembly. 

Legislation Passed By Senate

BillCurrent StatusSponsorSynopsisTitle
HB 255 w/ HA 1PassedK. JohnsonThis Act criminalizes the deprivation of civil rights modeled after federal law (18 U.S.C. 242) and enforced by the Delaware Department of Justice’s Division of Civil Rights and Public Trust. The new crime of deprivation of civil rights would be a Class A misdemeanor, which could elevate to a Class D or Class B felony depending on the nature of the injury or harm. This new crime of deprivation of civil rights serves as a predicate offense for hate crimes, or for racketeering if committed by an enterprise. By including conduct committed under color of any ordinance, regulation, or custom, this law accounts for conduct by actors in areas such as banking, lending, leasing, government contracts or political operatives.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO CIVIL RIGHTS.
HB 277 w/ HA 1PassedLynnThis Act codifies the principle set forth in Doe v. Bicking, 2020 Del. Super. LEXIS 43, *32, 2020 WL 374677 (Del. Super. Jan. 22, 2020) that recognizes that in cases of childhood sexual abuse by an employee of a school, organization, or business that serves or cares for children, the perpetrator often has authority and power over the child victim, which can be enabled by the perpetrator’s position in that institution. If a child is abused while the perpetrator is doing the perpetrator’s job, the employer should be responsible. This Act also changes the standard of culpability from “gross negligence” to “negligence” for public schools in civil claims based on childhood sexual abuse. Children who are sexually abused by private employer employees (e.g. daycare providers, private schools, etc.) have more protection than children abused by their teachers and coaches at public schools. There should be one standard of care that holds schools and businesses equally accountable when their recklessness, inattention, or failure to act causes a student to be sexually abused. This Act seeks to avoid future instances of the result in Bates v. Caesar Rodney Sch. Dist., No. 13, 2021, 2021 Del. LEXIS 315 (Del. Oct. 6, 2021), a case which held that when a student is abused at school by a teacher, the school has no legal responsibility. This Act takes effect 90 days after its enactment into law. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 10 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO LIABILITY FOR SEXUAL ABUSE OF A CHILD BY AN ADULT EMPLOYEE OF A SCHOOL, ORGANIZATION, OR BUSINESS.
HS 1 for HB 264 w/ HA 1PassedGriffithThis Act permits a person who has been the victim of non-consensual sexual conduct or non-consensual sexual penetration to apply for a sexual violence protective order if the person has a reasonable fear, based on specific conduct occurring contemporaneously or subsequent to the non-consensual sexual conduct or penetration, that the perpetrator of the sexual conduct will harm the petitioner in the future. An ex parte temporary order may be issued if a petitioner proves by a preponderance of the evidence that the respondent poses an immediate and present danger of causing physical injury to the petitioner. The protective order is a civil remedy available whether or not the respondent has been charged with a crime and whether or not the petitioner reported the respondent’s conduct to law enforcement officials. The Act provides for an emergency ex parte hearing as well as a non-emergency hearing in Superior Court. Possible remedies in addition to an order restraining the respondent from any kind of contact with the petitioner include restraining the respondent form going to, or remaining in, the places a petitioner might frequent including home, school, or work. Violation of a sexual violence protective order is punishable as criminal contempt, either as a class A misdemeanor, or Class F felony if contempt of the order results in physical injury, or involved threatened use, or use of, a deadly weapon or firearm. Petitions under the Act must be verified. If any party falsely swears in a petition or hearing under the Act, the person may be liable for a misdemeanor or felony. A sexual violence protection order is available only for petitioners who would not qualify for a protection from abuse order because there is no family or dating relationship between the victim and perpetrator. The Act also makes technical corrections to existing law to make it conform to the Legislative Drafting Manual. The Act takes effect 6 months after its enactment.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLES 10 AND 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO PROTECTIVE ORDERS FOR VICTIMS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE.
HS 1 for HB 293PassedBaumbachHouse Bill No. 293 requires that meetings of public bodies that are open to the public must provide an opportunity for public comment. Meetings of a public body of the General Assembly are excluded from the requirement to provide an opportunity for public comment because under § 9 of Art. II of the Delaware Constitution, the rules of proceedings for legislative meetings are established by the Senate and House of Representatives of each General Assembly. House Substitute No. 1 for House Bill No. 293 differs from House Bill No. 293 by revising the limitations a public body may impose on public comment as follows: 1. It requires that the time for public comment provide a meaningful opportunity for the public to engage with the public body. 2. Allows a public body to impose reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions on the length of the public comment period and the amount of time allotted for each person providing public comment. This Act also makes technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual and requires a greater than majority vote for passage because § 1 of Article IX of the Delaware Constitution requires the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members elected to each house of the General Assembly to amend a charter issued to a municipal corporation.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 29 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO PUBLIC COMMENT AT OPEN MEETINGS.
HB 339 w/ HA 1, HA 2PassedBushThis Act provides protection to homeowners from sellers that may have misled buyers (or their settlement attorneys) regarding a criminal judgment that attached to real property. It prevents innocent owners from potentially becoming a second victim by having a prior owner’s lien attach for more than 7 years after the settlement.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLES 10 AND 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE REAL PROPERTY LIEN OF CRIMINAL-RELATED JUDGMENTS.
HB 368PassedWilson-AntonThis Act deletes from the Delaware Code a derogatory and highly offensive term for Italian-, Spanish-, and Portuguese-American immigrants.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 16 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO FIREWORKS.
SA 1 to SS 1 for SB 14PassedEnnisThis amendment removes the language in Senate Substitute No. 1 to Senate Bill No. 14 and in the Synopsis that refers to the Board of Pension Trustees making a determination about a pension increase.  
HB 394PassedLambertThis Act provides that the Department of Correction must provide a copy of all policies relating to the accrual and forfeiture of good time to inmates, as well as a quarterly written accounting of good time credit earned and/or forfeited. The requirement that all accrued time must be forfeited upon conviction of any crime within custody, the complete forfeiture will apply only to commission of felonies. Forfeiture of good times for rule violations is changed to apply only to Class I disciplinary violations. The Act also updates § 4322 of Title 11 to allow dissemination of Department of Correction policies and procedures to inmates and the public where such dissemination would not endanger safety or security of a correctional facility, corrections staff, inmates, or the public.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION.
SB 274 w/ HA 1PassedGayThis bill continues the practice of amending periodically the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act (the “Act”) to keep it current and to maintain its national preeminence. The following is a section-by-section review of the proposed amendments of the Act. Section 1. This section amends Section 17-101(14) of the Act to confirm that any registered series or protected series of a limited partnership is bound by the partnership agreement of such limited partnership regardless of whether the series executed the partnership agreement. This amendment is not intended to imply that other references to “limited partnership” in the Act do not include protected series or registered series thereof (to the extent required by the context). This section also amends Section 17-101(14) of the Act to insert a new clause c. to confirm that a partnership agreement may include or incorporate multiple documents that may govern the business or affairs of the limited partnership or any of its series. Section 2. This section amends Section 17-113(b) to confirm that a signature on a certificate of partnership interest may be a manual, facsimile, or electronic signature. Section 3. This section amends Section 17-204(d) of the Act to clarify that the execution of a certificate by a person who is authorized by the Act to execute such certificate constitutes an oath or affirmation that, to the best of such person’s knowledge and belief, the facts stated therein shall be true at the time such certificate becomes effective, not at the time such certificate is executed. Section 4. This section amends Section 17-215(g) of the Act to provide that the approval of a limited partnership domestication in the manner provided for by the document, instrument, agreement or other writing, as the case may be, governing the internal affairs of the non-United States entity and the conduct of its business or by applicable non-Delaware law, as appropriate, and the approval of the partnership agreement by the same authorization required to approve the domestication, are required to occur prior to the time a certificate of limited partnership domestication becomes effective. Section 5. This section amends Section 17-217(h) of the Act to provide that the approval of a conversion to a limited partnership in the manner provided for by the document, instrument, agreement or other writing, as the case may be, governing the internal affairs of the other entity and the conduct of its business or by applicable law, as appropriate, and the approval of the partnership agreement by the same authorization required to approve the conversion, are required to occur prior to the time a certificate of conversion to limited partnership becomes effective. Section 6. This section amends Section 17-1110(b) of the Act to make conforming changes. Section 7. This section amends Section 17-1111 of the Act to (i) clarify the effect of the filing of a certificate of revival of limited partnership on any protected series of such limited partnership that are not, at the time of such filing, otherwise terminated and wound up and any registered series of such limited partnership whose certificates of registered series are not, at the time of such filing, otherwise cancelled, and (ii) make other conforming changes. Section 8. This section provides that the proposed amendments to the Act shall become effective August 1, 2022.AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 17, TITLE 6 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE CREATION, REGULATION, OPERATION AND DISSOLUTION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS AND THE REGISTRATION AND REGULATION OF FOREIGN LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS.
HS 1 for HB 206 w/ HA 1PassedK. WilliamsThis bill requires criminal background checks for any current or prospective employee, contractor, and volunteer of the Division of Health and Social Services (DHSS) who visits children in their homes and in the community and has regular, direct access to children or adolescents under the age of 18. The background check includes fingerprinting for Delaware and national background checks as well as a check of the Child Protection Registry. An individual who has a disqualifying criminal conviction or is on the Child Protection Registry at Level III or IV may not be an employee, contractor, or volunteer in any capacity that involves visiting children in their homes or the community or having regular, direct access to children. DHSS, if it chooses, may use its Background Check Center, which processes background checks for individuals working in home-care and long-term care facilities. It differs from the original bill in that it permits DHSS to use its Background Check Center to accomplish these additional background checks, specifies Child Protection Registry status that is disqualifying, and makes other minor technical changes.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 29 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO BACKGROUND CHECKS FOR EMPLOYEES, CONTRACTORS, AND VOLUNTEERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES.
HJR 7PassedBaumbachThe Joint Resolution directs the Delaware Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) and Division of Public Health (DPH) to conduct After Action Reviews to assess the State’s pandemic response. DEMA and DPH are also maintaining the ability to increase personnel and supplies as needed in response to future surges of COVID-19. Additionally, the Joint Resolution directs the Legislative and Executive branches to work together on initiatives to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. DIRECTING THE STATE TO CONDUCT PANDEMIC AFTER- ACTION REVIEWS AND CONTINUE COVID-19 PANDEMIC MITIGATION EFFORTS.
HB 401PassedMatthewsThis Act amends Title 21 to specify the requirements for an applicant to obtain or renew a motor vehicle dealer license and aligns the requirements with other state licensing requirements. The current law only requires the applicant to show they have and will comply with the laws of this state and other states. Due to the statute’s current ambiguity the Division of Motor Vehicles is often asked to review an applicant’s criminal history prior to submission of a full application which makes it difficult for the Division to determine if the applicant qualifies for licensure.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 21 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO VEHICLE DEALERSHIP OWNERS LICENSES.
HB 402PassedPostlesThis Act amends the Charter of the City of Milford by allowing the City to adopt the assessments of real property conducted by Kent and Sussex County. Also, it states that if the value was obtained from either of the two counties, such information will be included in the public notice, and any objections as to the value of a property shall be taken to the county where the property is located.AN ACT TO AMEND THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF MILFORD.
HB 434PassedGriffithThis legislation is based on information technology (“IT”) recommendations of the Government Efficiency and Accountability Review (“GEAR”) Board established by Governor Carney’s Executive Order Four. This act removes the sunset clause in 9016F (formerly 9016C) Chapter 90C of Title 29 of the Delaware Code and allows for the establishment of a shared IT services model for state agencies. The shared services model centralizes the following duties and related executive branch personnel under DTI: technology end user support, cyber security, network management, server management, data management, IT project management, software application development/support, IT procurement oversight, IT fiscal planning, IT standards, and technology governance. In addition to facilitating the delivery of technology services in a consistent and comprehensive manner, technology centralization will position the State to stay abreast of technologies to enable innovation and enhance services to Delawareans. IT centralization also supports regulatory compliance requirements (e.g. IRS, CJIS), network and data security, and provides controls for the overall State IT landscape and spend.AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 185, VOLUME 82 OF THE LAWS OF DELAWARE RELATING TO REALLOCATION OF TECHNOLOGY PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT FROM EXECUTIVE BRANCH AGENCIES.
HB 442 w/ HA 1PassedBentzDelaware’s per capita health care spending consistently ranks in the top ten highest spending states and has historically outpaced economic growth in Delaware. Enhanced transparency and shared accountability for spending and quality targets have been used to accelerate changes in our health care delivery system, creating benefits for employers, state government and health care consumers. House Joint Resolution 7 of the 149th General Assembly and Executive Order Nineteen tasked the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) with the establishment of annual health care spending and quality benchmarks as a strategy to address the unsustainable growth in health care spending while also measuring aspects of health care quality. This Act serves to replace Executive Order Twenty-Five which established Delaware’s Spending and Quality Benchmark initiative in 2018. The codification of these benchmarks supports the continuation of Delaware’s Road to Value by improving the transparency of health care spending and quality, as well as providing attainable goals needed to achieve better health care, lower costs, and healthier communities. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 16 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE DELAWARE HEALTH CARE COMMISSION AND STATE OF DELAWARE HEALTH CARE SPENDING AND QUALITY BENCHMARKS.
HB 446PassedBushThe Kent County Levy Court sets equal compensation for the members and chairpersons of all Kent County boards and commissions in the annual operating budget ordinance. Currently all members of the other boards and commissions are compensated at a rate of $150.00 per meeting attended. Chairpersons are compensated at a rate of $175.00 per meeting attended. This Act will allow the members and Chairperson of the Board of Assessment Review to receive the same compensation as those appointed to all other boards and commissions by the Kent County Levy Court.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 9 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO KENT COUNTY BOARD OF ASSESSMENT REVIEW.
HB 449 w/ HA 1PassedOsienskiPresently there is no licensure mechanism in place in Delaware for elevator mechanics. This Act creates a new chapter in Title 24 and establishes a regulatory State Board of Elevator Mechanics consisting of 5 members appointed by the Governor including 1 public member, 1 member representing the elevator industry,1 member primarily engaged in elevator repair or maintenance, 1 representing elevator inspection, consulting or engineering firms, and 1 representing a labor organization for elevator mechanics and apprentices. The Board has the responsibility of formulating rules and regulations consistent with the APA under Title 29. The Board, under its rules and regulations, will establish standards for licensure, as a master elevator mechanic and journeyman elevator mechanic and continuing education requirements. The Act sets forth grounds for discipline including suspension and revocation of a license. A finding that an individual has been found guilty of performing elevator mechanical work without a license, or under false pretense of being licensed, is a misdemeanor subject to monetary fines by the justice of the Peace court. There is a grandfather exception for individuals that have master electrical special elevator licenses at the time of enactment. The implementation date is the earlier of 6 months after enactment or when the Registrar of Regulations has been provided notice that rules and regulations have been promulgated.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 24 AND TITLE 29 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO ELEVATOR MECHANICS.
HB 452PassedSchwartzkopfThis Act is the first leg of an amendment to the Delaware Constitution to make necessary technical corrections identified by the General Assembly's Division of Research. Specifically, these technical corrections consist of the following: Section 1 and Section 12 of this Act work in concert to transfer the date of the commencement of the terms of the members of the General Assembly from the Constitution’s Schedule to Article II (relating to the General Assembly) to avoid confusion and for ease of locating this information. Section 2 of this Act deletes § 24 of Article II of the Delaware Constitution to remove antiquated language to conform the Delaware Constitution to existing practice. This Section dates back to the Delaware Constitution of 1792 when the State Treasurer was also considered what we now know as the State Accountant, the Budget Director, the Director of Revenue, and the Secretary of Finance. The purpose of this Section was to provide the General Assembly with one, detailed report indicating that the State’s books were balanced and finances were being managed properly. Over time, as other, more specific roles were created within State government, the State Treasurer’s role in these aspects were shifted to other executive branch officers. Today, this constitutional requirement is now being met by several different state agencies in several different forms, all culminating in final products overseen by entities like the Delaware Economic and Financial Advisory Council (DEFAC), the Cash Management Policy Board, and the General Assembly itself, and take the form of final reports issued to the General Assembly, administrative paperwork, and legislation like the annual appropriations act and annual capital improvement act. Section 3 of this Act corrects a codification error. The sentence stricken in Section 3 of this Act was originally to be struck by Chapter 607, Volume 50 of the Laws of Delaware in 1956. However, the sentence remains in the Delaware Constitution to this day. See Opinion of the Justices, 405 A.2d 694, 697 fn. 6 (1979). Section 4 of this Act updates the name of the State officer and State agency involved in determining whether the Governor is able or unable to discharge the Governor’s duties, which has changed since the adoption of this Section in 1969. Section 5 and Section 13 of this Act work in concert to transfer the date of the commencement of the terms of certain State and County elective executive branch officers from the Constitution’s Schedule to Article III (relating to the Executive) to avoid confusion and for ease of locating this information. Section 6 of this Act designates § 2 of Article V to make an internal reference clear. Section 7 of this Act makes changes to ensure the accurate adoption of an amendment to the Constitution proposed in 1998 by 71 Del. Laws, ch. 398. The amendment proposed in 1998 was proposed by Senate Bill No. 277 of the 139th General Assembly, which was later replaced by Senate Substitute No. 1 to Senate Bill No. 277. Senate Substitute No. 1 to Senate Bill No. 277 passed the General Assembly. When the 140th General Assembly concurred in the proposed amendment, the General Assembly used the language of Senate Bill No. 277 instead of Senate Substitute No. 1 to Senate Bill No. 277. See 72 Del. Laws, ch. 437 (Senate Bill No. 394 of the 140th General Assembly). This change ensures the original intent to concur in the language of Senate Substitute No. 1 to Senate Bill No. 277 is achieved. To properly achieve this change, the version of § 6 of Article V that existed before the passage of 72 Del. Laws, ch. 437 is shown as struck through in this Section. Section 7 of this Act also makes additional technical corrections to conform existing law to current practice and to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual. Sections 8 and 9 of this Act hyphenates “three fourths” to ensure consistent hyphenation of the supermajority vote requirements throughout the Constitution. Section 10 also makes additional technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual; specifically, to ensure use of the serial comma in two places in this Section. Section 10 of this Act corrects an incorrect reference to another provision of the Delaware Constitution. The reference to “Section 30” has existed in Section 7 of Article XV of the Delaware Constitution since its adoption in 1897; however, in 1951, a constitutional amendment was adopted to reorganize Delaware’s Judiciary. See 48 Del. Laws, ch. 109. That reorganization resulted in deletion and renumbering of Sections originally contained in Article IV of the Delaware Constitution, as adopted in 1897, but did not account for the internal reference to Section 30. Section 11 of this Act hyphenates “two thirds” to ensure consistent hyphenation of the supermajority vote requirements throughout the Constitution. House Bill No. 130 of the 151st General Assembly proposes an amendment to this Section and makes a technical correction to the first “two thirds” but not the second. This Section is intended to ensure that, on the 152nd General Assembly’s concurrence in House Bill No. 130 and this Act, the correct hyphenation of “two thirds” is achieved throughout this Section. This Act requires a greater than majority vote for passage because § 1 of Article XVI of the Delaware Constitution requires the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members elected to each house of the General Assembly to amend the Delaware Constitution.AN ACT PROPOSING AMENDMENTS TO THE DELAWARE CONSTITUTION RELATING TO TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS.
HB 453 w/ HA 1PassedSchwartzkopfThis Act makes necessary updates to Delaware Code provisions codifying procedures related to the General Assembly to bring these provisions into compliance with current practice and to make technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual. This Act makes the following substantive changes to these provisions: (1) In Section 8, repeals a procedure that, after the enactment of the Delaware Constitution of 1897, is no longer part of the legislative process. And, in Sections 17, 18, and 19 makes conforming repeals. (2) In Section 9, updates the amount of additional compensation paid to members of the General Assembly who are elected to leadership positions or appointed to serve on a joint committee, consistent with the amounts authorized under the most recent report of the Compensation Commission. (3) In Section 10, updates the amount of the stipend paid to members of the General Assembly consistent with the amount authorized under the most recent report of the Compensation Commission. (4) In Section 13, updates the process for appointing a bill clerk for the Senate and House of Representatives and the duties of the bill clerk. (5) In Section 14, removes the Passed Bill Committee (“Committee”), which has not existed since the mid-1960s. The Committee’s duties related to management and tracking of passed and enacted legislation are reassigned to the Secretary of the Senate and Chief Clerk of the House of Representatives, who have these duties currently. The Committee’s duties related to engrossing legislation are reassigned to the Division of Research, which has these duties currently. The Division is authorized to correct manifest clerical, typographical, and grammatical errors discovered in the engrossment process and required to proofread the engrossment before release to ensure an accurate engrossment of the amendment to the legislation. (6) In Section 15 and 16, changes references to “print” or “printing” to “publish” or “publication” in recognition of 21st Century methods of distributing information. (7) In Section 22, replaces the requirement that a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution be approved by two-thirds of the members of the General Assembly with a requirement that it be approved by a simple majority vote. The two-third vote requirement is unconstitutional under the Delaware Constitution because it conflicts with Section 10 of Article II of the Delaware Constitution, which provides for the passage of legislation by the concurrence of a majority of members elected to each house. The General Assembly cannot alter the requirement of a majority vote without an amendment to the Delaware Constitution. See Section 512 of Mason’s Manual of Legislative Procedure (2020).AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 29 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.
SB 330CommitteeBrownThis Act provides that properties owned by the Riverfront Development Corporation of Delaware are exempt from taxation. The Riverfront Development Corporation of Delaware is an entity created by State law for purposes of planning and development of the area along the Brandywine and Christina Rivers. Removing tax burdens from the Riverfront Development Corporation of Delaware will enable it to better engage in its development efforts, including attracting other investors and tenants, and ultimately promote the common good of the citizens of this State.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 29 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO EXEMPTION FROM TAXATION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.
HCR 98PassedMinor-BrownThis Resolution designates July 2022 as "Uterine Fibroids Awareness Month" and encourages public awareness of the effects of fibroids on many individuals' lives.SUPPORTING THE DESIGNATION OF JULY 2022 AS UTERINE FIBROIDS AWARENESS MONTH.
HCR 102PassedSchwartzkopfThis concurrent resolution recognizes and honors the young women of Delaware participating in the 2022 session of Delaware Girls State.HONORING THE YOUNG WOMEN FROM ACROSS THE STATE OF DELAWARE PARTICIPATING IN THE 2022 SESSION OF DELAWARE GIRLS STATE.
SA 3 to SS 1 for SB 14PassedEnnisThis amendment makes the provision authorizing pensioners retired for more than 20 years to receive a pension increase greater than those pensioners retired less than 20 years prior to a pension increase subject to available funding and appropriations by the General Assembly in the annual state budget act. This amendment also makes the future pension rate increases from the Fiscal Year 2023 rate of 1.0% to 2.33% subject to available funding and appropriations by the General Assembly in the annual state budget act.  
HCR 105PassedDorsey WalkerThis concurrent resolution recognizes the month of June 2022 as Caribbean American Heritage Month in the State of Delaware.RECOGNIZING JUNE AS CARIBBEAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH IN THE STATE OF DELAWARE.
HCR 104PassedK. WilliamsThis Concurrent Resolution commends and congratulates the Secretary of Education Scholars for 2022.COMMENDING THE STUDENTS SELECTED AS SECRETARY OF EDUCATION SCHOLARS FOR 2022.
SA 1 to SB 322PassedWalsh This amendment makes a technical correction to the bill and establishes an effective date of January 1, 2023. 

Legislation Passed By House of Representatives

BillCurrent StatusSponsorSynopsisTitle
SB 144 w/ SA 1 + HA 2PassedPinkneyThis Act modernizes the hate crime statute and consolidates related offenses together with the hate crime statute in the Criminal Code. Changes to the hate crime statute include: (1) That the hate crime be motivated, in whole or in part, on a bias. This reflects instances where a hate crime is committed but is only motivated in part by hate in addition to another component. (2) That the focus be on the defendant’s belief or perception. Currently our law focuses on the victim’s actual race, gender, religion, or other immutable characteristic, rather than focusing on the state of mind of the defendant. This change refocuses the inquiry on the defendant’s state of mind, and specifically, what the defendant believes to be true at the time the act was committed. (3) Prohibiting any crime committed in whole or in part on a belief or perception of an immutable characteristic of a group. This Act adds “group” to make clear that a hate crime can be committed because of the hate towards a group at large. In addition, this Act does the following: (1) Combines and updates the existing desecration and desecration of a burial place sections maintaining the existing penalties. (2) Establishes a right of civil remedies to allow individuals to seek relief from hate crime, desecration, and religious symbol burning related injury. (3) Requires law enforcement to report violations and investigations of violations of hate crimes to the Division of Civil Rights and Public Trust. This Act also makes technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 11 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC HEALTH, ORDER, AND DECENCY.
SB 261PassedEnnisThis act streamlines the appointment process for the Delaware Nutrient Management Commission, expands the definition of dairy farmer to include all cattlemen, consolidates the appointment authorities, and simplifies the number of representatives.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 3 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT.
SB 269PassedParadeeThis bill creates a special license plate for the Boy Scouts of America.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 21 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO SPECIAL LICENSE PLATES.
HA 1 to HB 354PassedMorrisonThis amendment adds the employer’s actual knowledge of an employee or employee family member’s citizenship or immigration status, in addition to suspected knowledge, to Delaware’s Whistleblower Act.  
SB 281SignedGayThis Act clarifies various aspects of the State’s unclaimed property laws, specifically: (1) Section 1 specifically exempts property owed to non-Delaware government entities and payment or credit arising under the 2022 Delaware Relief Rebate Program, Chapter 290 of Volume 83 of the Laws of Delaware. (2) Section 2 clarifies and confirms current practice that a holder under examination or in the voluntary disclosure program shall retain records from ten years plus the dormancy period to present day until completion of the examination or voluntary disclosure agreement. (3) Section 3 clarifies and confirms current practice regarding the timing of the liquidation of securities and the mailing of written notice to owners to eliminate litigation risk for the State. Under current practice, the State Escheator liquidates securities and mails written notice to owners relatively contemporaneously in weekly batches. Practically, however, at times liquidation may precede the mailing of notice by several days. However, because a claimant’s recovery is determined by the date the claim is filed relative to the date of notice, the claimant’s recovery is not impacted by this change. Because owner addresses reported by holders are often incomplete or have obvious errors, this Section also allows, but does not require, the State Escheator to take reasonable steps to update, correct, or validate owner addresses to make delivery of the written notice more likely, and limits liability for the State Escheator for any such actions or lack of actions. (4) Section 4 clarifies and confirms current practice regarding the timing of the liquidation of securities and the mailing of written notice to owners. (5) Section 5 clarifies how to determine the value of claims for securities property by clarifying a date certain for the statutory 558-day period to begin when the date of notice cannot otherwise be determined or when notice is not required or sent. (6) Section 6 clarifies and confirms current practice that the time for a claimant appeal to the Tax Appeal Board, where the State Escheator has paid the claim, begins to run on the initial issuance of payment, and is not reset or tolled by the re-issuance of a check. This Section also expressly permits the State Escheator to pay claims on a pro rata basis for property received before August 1, 2022, or resulting from a bankruptcy proceeding, when the reported amount of property exceeds the remitted amount, and expressly prohibits holders from relying on this Section to engage in this practice prospectively. (7) Section 7 clarifies and confirms current practice that the time for a claimant appeal to the Tax Appeal Board, where the State Escheator has paid the claim, begins to run on the initial issuance of payment, and is not reset or tolled by the re-issuance of a check. (8) Section 8 makes changes to allow the State Escheator to issue a notice of examination to any holder who has failed to respond to requests made pursuant to a verified report or compliance review or to complete a verified report or compliance review. This Section also makes changes to clarify and confirm current practice that a “reason to believe” standard does not apply to inquiries under § 1170 of Title 12. (9) Section 9 allows the State Escheator to issue a notice of examination to any holder who has failed to respond to requests made pursuant to a verified report or compliance review or to complete a verified report or compliance review under § 1170 of Title 12. (10) Section 10 responds to feedback received from the professional finder industry and clarifies and confirms current practice that the State will not disclose the exact amount of claimable property until a claimant’s rightful ownership of the property has been established and permits finder agreements to reflect this fraud prevention measure. (11) Section 11 states that Sections 1, 8, 9, and 10 of this Act take effect on enactment. (12) Section 12 states that it is the intent of the General Assembly that Sections 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 of this Act apply retroactively to any claims, examinations, voluntary disclosure agreements, or litigation pending as of the effective date of this Act. This Act also makes technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 12 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO UNCLAIMED PROPERTY.
SB 282PassedGayThis bill facilitates the expansion of the private flood insurance market through the adoption of the National Council of Insurance Legislators’ Model Private Primary Residential Flood Insurance Model. This Model has been used to facilitate increased consumer choice and access to flood insurance. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 18 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO PRIVATE FLOOD INSURANCE.
SB 284 w/ HA 1PassedMantzavinosThis Act continues the practice of amending periodically the Delaware Statutory Trust Act (the “Act”) to keep it current and to maintain its national preeminence. The following is a section-by-section review of proposed amendments of the Act. Sections 1, 3, 6, 8, 9, 13 and 15-17. The amendments add business development companies to a number of provisions of the Act that previously applied only to registered investment companies (within the meaning of the Investment Company Act of 1940). Though similar to registered investment companies in many respects, business development companies as a technical matter are not registered investment companies but instead elect to be subject to many of the federal regulations applicable to registered investment companies. Section 2. Section 3804(a) of the Act has been amended to clarify that, except to the extent otherwise provided in the governing instrument of a statutory trust, the trustees or other authorized persons, or the duly authorized agents of such trustees or other authorized persons, may bind a statutory trust to a contract or instrument by entering into such contract or instrument in the name of the statutory trust or in the name of any such person acting on behalf of the statutory trust. Section 4. This section amends Section 3806(b)(7) of the Act to provide that a trustee, officer, employee, manager or other person who may manage the business and affairs of the statutory trust may delegate any of its rights, powers and duties irrespective of whether it has a conflict of interest with respect to the matter as to which such rights, powers or duties are being delegated, and that the person or persons to whom any such rights, powers or duties are being delegated shall not be deemed conflicted solely by reason of the conflict of interest of the trustee, officer, employee, manager or other person who may manage the business and affairs of the statutory trust. The amendments to Section 3806(b)(7) create a different rule than the rule applied in cases such as Wenske v. Bluebell Creameries, Inc., 214 A.3d 958 (Del. Ch. 2019), that a conflicted principal is legally disabled from delegating authority over the subject matter as to which the principal is conflicted even to an independent delegate. Section 5. This section amends Section 3806(i) of the Act to confirm and clarify the broad power and authority of a trustee to delegate any or all of the trustee’s rights, powers and duties to manage and control the business and affairs of a statutory trust, including any core governance functions. In addition, this section amends Section 3806(i) of the Act to provide that a trustee may delegate any of its rights, powers and duties irrespective of whether it has a conflict of interest with respect to the matter as to which such rights, powers or duties are being delegated, and that the person or persons to whom any such rights, powers or duties are being delegated shall not be deemed conflicted solely by reason of the conflict of interest of the trustee. The amendments to Section 3806(i) create a different rule than the rule applied in cases such as Wenske v. Bluebell Creameries, Inc. 214 A.3d 958 (Del. Ch. 2019), that a conflicted principal is legally disabled from delegating authority over the subject matter as to which the principal is conflicted even to an independent delegate. Section 7. This section amends Section 3806 of the Act to add subsection (o) to provide a safe harbor procedure for ratifying acts or transactions that may be taken by or in respect of a statutory trust under the Act or a governing instrument that are void or voidable and waiving failures to comply with requirements of a governing instrument that make such acts and transactions void or voidable. New subsection (o) is intended to provide a rule different from the rule applied in Composecure, L.L.C. v. Cardux, LLC, 206 A.3d 807 (Del. 2018), and Absalom Absalom Trust v. Saint Gervais LLC, 2019 WL 2655787 (Del. Ch. June 27, 2019), that acts or transactions determined to be void generally may not be ratified. The penultimate sentence of new subsection (o) confirms that void or voidable actions may be ratified or requirements may be waived by other means permitted by law, and accordingly, new subsection (o) is not intended to preempt or restrict other valid means of ratifying acts or transactions or waiving requirements or to impair the effectiveness of any valid ratification or waiver previously effected. Section 10. This section adds a provision for the filing of a certificate by a trustee who has succeeded the predecessor trustee of one or more statutory trusts in order to amend the name and address of such trustee in each affected certificate of trust. Section 11. This section amends Section 3811(c) of the Act to clarify that the execution of a certificate by a person who is authorized by the Act to execute such certificate constitutes an oath or affirmation that, to the best of such person’s knowledge and belief, the facts stated therein shall be true at the time such certificate becomes effective, not at the time such certificate is executed. Section 12. This section specifies the fee payable in connection with the filing of a certificate under Section 3807(n). Section 14. This section amends Section 3819 of the Act to make certain clarifying and conforming changes, and to provide that when a beneficial owner is entitled to obtain information for a stated purpose (whether pursuant to Section 3819 or a governing instrument), the beneficial owner’s right shall be to obtain such information as is necessary and essential to achieving that purpose, unless such right has been expanded or restricted in the governing instrument. To the extent current law is that the “necessary and essential” test does not apply by default to (i) a beneficial owner’s right under Section 3819(a) of the Act to obtain information from a statutory trust for a purpose reasonably related to the beneficial owner’s interest as a beneficial owner of the statutory trust or (ii) a beneficial owner’s right under a governing instrument to obtain information from a statutory trust for a stated purpose, new subsection (f) is intended to change that law. Section 18. This section amends Section 3826(b) of the Act to confirm that a signature on a certificate of beneficial interest may be a manual, facsimile or electronic signature. Section 19. This section adds Subchapter III to the Act to add a control beneficial interest acquisition provision for statutory trusts registered under the 1940 Act as closed-end management investment companies or statutory trusts that are closed-end management investment companies that have elected to be regulated as business development companies under the 1940 Act and that in either case have a class of equity securities listed on a national securities exchange registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. § 78a et seq.) or designated for trading on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System (NASDAQ). Section 20. This section provides that the proposed amendments of the Act shall become effective August 1, 2022.AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 38, TITLE 12 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE CREATION, REGULATION, OPERATION, AND DISSOLUTION OF DOMESTIC STATUTORY TRUSTS.
SB 286PassedHansenThis Act shall be known as the “New Castle County Neighborhood Improvement District Act.” The Act assembles New Castle County resources under “one roof” to focus comprehensively on persistent, and in some cases legacy, neighborhood problems, thereby promoting the possibilities of successfully resolving systemic neighborhood problems. Summary of the Act: • The Act provides for creation of a Neighborhood Improvement District (a “NID”). • Creation of a neighborhood district provides a source of funding for enhanced services in neighborhoods that are especially in need of such services, including, for example, district-wide snow removal, district-wide trash collection, and maintenance of open space. • A primary, but not exclusive, source of funding for the enhanced services is a special assessment on non-exempt properties located within the NID, the primary beneficiaries in the neighborhood. • A NID may be initiated by submission of a voluntary petition by property owners or residents in the district, or by the County, subject to objection by at least 50%, in number, of the non-exempt specially assessed property owners in the district. • A NID will be created and is to exist for only as long as necessary to resolve problems in a neighborhood, and then, after accomplishing its goal of resolving persistent neighborhood problems, it will be subject to dissolution. AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 9 AND TITLE 17 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO NEW CASTLE COUNTY NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENT DISTRICTS.
SB 296PassedGayThis bill raises the threshold for licensed property appraisers so that they may appraise residential units valued at $400,000.00 or less as a way to meet market demand. It also changes the requirements for licensure, such that property appraisers must file annual certificates but only renew their registrations every other year.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 24 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS.
SB 297 w/ SA 1PassedSokolaThis Act adopts the Uniform Law Commission's Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act ("Revised Act"), revising Chapter 54, Title 24 of the Delaware Code, which is based on the Uniform Law Commission's Uniform Athlete Agents Act ("Uniform Act"). The Uniform Law Commission “provides states with non-partisan, well-conceived and well-drafted legislation that brings clarity and stability to critical areas of state statutory law.” In the early 2000's, Delaware and 42 other states adopted the Uniform Act. Delaware's version of the Uniform Act included a Board of Athlete Agents Examiners ("Board"), which was sunsetted by the Joint Legislative Oversight and Sunset Committee in 2012 and removed from the Delaware Code by Senate Bill 184 of the 146th General Assembly (78 Del. Laws, c. 376). In addition to removing provisions related to the Board, Senate Bill 184 also removed provisions requiring athlete agents doing business in Delaware to be registered and subject to administrative oversight. In 2015, the Uniform Law Commission adopted the Revised Act to enhance protections for student athletes and educational institutions, create a uniform body of athlete agent registration information, and simplify the registration process. The changes made to the Uniform Act by the Revised Act became necessary as athlete agent tactics have become more advanced and the industry has become more sophisticated. The need for the Revised Act is highlighted by a recent FBI investigation into athlete agent activities related to the college basketball programs at a number of Division I schools. The need is also highlighted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s adoption of an interim policy in June 2021 that removes restrictions on student athletes receiving compensation for their name, image, and likeness. Coinciding with this change, there has been an increase in athlete agent registrations in states with laws requiring registration. The adoption of the Revised Act provides safeguards for student athletes by requiring that athlete agents be registered and that agency contracts contain specific notice provisions. The Revised Act has been enacted by 18 states, with 4 of those enactments occurring in 2021.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 24 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO ATHLETE AGENTS.
SB 309PassedHansenSection 716(a) of Title 24 prohibits annual or lifetime numerical limits on chiropractic visits for the treatment of back pain. The treatment of chronic back pain through chiropractic supportive care can prevent patients from requiring opioid pain medications or more expensive treatments. This Act prohibits the denial of insurance coverage under § 716(a) for chiropractic supportive care, which constitutes maintenance therapy. This requirement applies to policies, contracts, or certificates issued, renewed, modified, altered, amended, or reissued after December 31, 2023. In addition, this Act clarifies, but does not expand, the insurance coverage subject to the requirements under § 716(a), states that the requirements under this subsection cannot be waived by contract, and requires that the regulations implementing § 176 establish utilization review standards. This Act also updates the definitions in Chapter 7 of Title 24 to be consistent with the current scope of chiropractic practice and makes corresponding revisions to the terms used in existing law. This Act also makes technical corrections to conform existing law to the standards of the Delaware Legislative Drafting Manual.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 24 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE PRACTICE OF CHIROPRACTIC.
SB 250SignedParadeeThis Bill is the Fiscal Year 2023 Appropriations Act.AN ACT MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE EXPENSE OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2023; SPECIFYING CERTAIN PROCEDURES, CONDITIONS AND LIMITATIONS FOR THE EXPENDITURE OF SUCH FUNDS; AND AMENDING CERTAIN PERTINENT STATUTORY PROVISIONS.
SB 251SignedParadeeThis Act appropriates $378,613,700 to provide one-time funded projects through the Office of Management and Budget.AN ACT MAKING A ONE-TIME SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2023 TO THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET.
SB 319PassedTownsendThis bill creates a special license plate for atTAcK addiction.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 21 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO SPECIAL LICENSE PLATES.
HA 1 to HB 468PassedSmykThis amendment clarifies that the flashing lights are being used for traffic control. 
HA 1 to SB 284PassedBush This Amendment does the following: (1) Changes the fee payable for a certificate filed under § 3807(n) of Title 12 of the Delaware Code. (2) Changes the effective date for Sections 10 and 12 of this Act. 
HA 2 to SB 144PassedMorrisonThis Amendment does all of the following: (1) Removes threatening to commit an act of desecration or cross or religious symbol burning from the definition of those offenses. (2) Removes damage to “any private property or structure” from the definition of desecration. (3) Clarifies that parents or legal guardians are only civilly liable for the intentional hate crime tort of a child if it can be shown that they knew of the propensity of the child to commit a violation of § 1304, § 1305, or § 1306 of Title 11. 
SJR 8SignedParadeeThis Resolution provides the official revenue, refund, and unencumbered funds estimates for Fiscal Year 2022.THE OFFICIAL GENERAL FUND REVENUE ESTIMATE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022.
SJR 9SignedParadeeThis Resolution provides the official revenue, refund, and unencumbered funds estimates for Fiscal Year 2023.THE OFFICIAL GENERAL FUND REVENUE ESTIMATE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2023.

Senate Committee Assignments

Committee
Corrections & Public Safety
Environment & Energy
Executive
Finance
Labor
Legislative Oversight & Sunset

House Committee Assignments

Committee
Administration
Appropriations
Economic Development/Banking/Insurance & Commerce
Health & Human Development
Revenue & Finance

Senate Committee Report

Committee
Finance

House Committee Report

Committee
Agriculture
Appropriations
Education
Judiciary
Public Safety & Homeland Security

Senate Defeated Legislation

BillCurrent StatusSponsorSynopsisTitle
SB 170DefeatedLawsonCurrently, Delaware law permits the display of a flag of the United States of America on a flagpole attached to a residential structure. The law also permits display on a flagpole on the premises, but only if the flagpole was installed prior to the termination of developer control. This bill would remove that restriction, such that an individual would be permitted to display a flag of the United States of America on a flagpole even if the flagpole was installed after termination of developer control and regardless of other community association restrictions, deed restrictions, or other restrictions to the contrary.AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 25 OF DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO DISPLAY OF FLAGS.

House Defeated Legislation

No House Defeated Legislation

Nominations Enacted upon by the Senate

No Records